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    How to spend 48 hours in Prague

    Prague is a popular city for a weekend city break, and it’s not hard to understand why. It’s just under two hours from the UK, boasts an easy-to-navigate airport, and the city centre doesn’t sprawl too far. It also has plenty to see and do - whether you’re a history buff, beer-drinker, or foodie.

    When you pass through customs and have collected your luggage, hop on the AE airport shuttle. It runs every 30 minutes and – for quite a reasonable price – will take you right into the city centre.  You can buy a ticket from the transportation stand once you arrive at the airport. Then you are free to enjoy your entire weekend in Prague – and we’ve even pulled together this quick itinerary for you.  

    Day 1

    Visit the Charles Bridge

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    Potentially the most recognisable structure in Prague but, because of this, the crowds can build up quickly. So make sure you get there first thing, especially if you want to get some good pictures.

    Breakfast at Café Louvre

    Once the crowds start to arrive it’s time for you to fuel up for the rest of the day. We recommend trying out the historical Café Louvre, which is 10 minutes away and usually opens its doors at 8am (which is quite early by Prague standards). Their breakfast menu is extensive with six pre-made breakfast plates (small, Czech, French, Hangover, Northern, and Fit), as well as a generous list of smaller plates (including pancakes and scrambled eggs).

    Explore the Old Town

     

    Famous astronomical clock Orloj in Prague.jpg

    You can’t visit Prague and bypass the scenic Old Town. There is a long list of buildings and sites to keep an eye out for, including the Astronomical Clock, the Church of Our Lady before Týn, the Old Town Hall, the National Gallery and the Church of St. James the Greater. Make sure you also take the time to explore the side streets and tiny alleys.

    Jewish Quarter

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    Only a stone’s throw away from the Old Town lies the Jewish Quarter – which is one of the best preserved Jewish quarters in Europe. The must-visit sites are the Old Jewish Cemetery, Pinkas Synagogue, and The Jewish Museum.

    Diner at Lokál

    The Old Town is filled to the brim with appetising restaurants that locals and visitors love – but if we were to choose one it would be Lokál. Here you can enjoy hearty, homemade Czech cuisine made in the slow, good old-fashioned way without artificial ingredients. The smoked meat on the menu is even prepared at their very own butcher shop!

    Hemingway Bar

    Relax at the end of your final night with a tipple at the Hemingway Bar. The drinks menu here is one of the most extensive in the city – with a specialty in absinthe, champagne, and rum. In fact, there are 200 rums behind the bar!

    Day 2

    Breakfast at Cafe Savoy

    Start your second day with breakfast at one of Prague’s oldest and most successful restaurants. Café Savoy is housed in a building that dates back to 1893 (remember to look up and admire the Neo-Renaissance ceiling). They have a generous breakfast menu, which includes continental, English, and French breakfasts; as well as 11 different ways to have your eggs. They also offer 5 small plates if a big breakfast isn’t your thing.

    Prague Castle

    Prague Castle.jpg

    When you’re fuelled up, you’re in a great location to explore Prague Castle. Not only is it breathtakingly beautiful, it is also the largest coherent castle complex in the world and dates back to the 9th Century. It’s currently the official residence of the President of the Czech Republic, and was once a seat of power for kings of Bohemia and the Holy Roman emperors.

    Your basic fare to enter the castle is 500 CZK and there are tours available at an additional cost.

    John Lennon Wall

    John Lennon.jpg

    Sixteen minutes on foot (and back towards the Charles Bridge) you’ll find the colourful John Lennon Wall. After the 1980 assassination of John Lennon, an unknown artist drew a portrait of John Lennon on the wall, and quickly after followed other Lennon and Beatles-inspired graffiti. The wall has been painted over a few times, and the original John Lennon portrait is now lost under years of graffiti. Today, the wall represents a symbol of global ideals such as love and peace.

    Letná Park

    View over river in Prague from Letná hill.jpg

    Now it’s time to relax a little and enjoy incredible views of Prague from the beautiful Letná Park – where you’ll find some incredible hidden gems. At the base of the park, you’ll spot a very large ticking metronome which is where the world’s largest monument to Stalin once stood (it was blown up in 1962). To the right of the metronome is the Hanavsky Pavilion, where you’ll find cute little neo Baroque cast iron structure built for the Jubilee World Exhibition in 1891, where you can now stop for a cake and cappuccino. You can also dine at Belcredi, a fine dining establishment situated in an Italian style Palace, or relax with a beer at Letná Beer Garden.

    Explore the New Town

    Dancing House.jpg

    Prague might be a city drenched in history with beautiful cobblestone streets, but it also has a modern side too. We recommend you spend a late afternoon just exploring the New Town, and see where it takes you. Some key sites include Dancing House, Wenceslas Square, Ss. Cyril and Methodius Cathedral, and the National Museum of Prague.

    Dinner at The Globe

    When you’re finished admiring the buildings of the New Town, it’s time to treat yourself to the local foodie scene. There are several delicious restaurants to choice from, but we recommend The Globe. It opened in 1993, and since then has become a Prague institution. The building it is hosted in dates back 115 years (don’t be fooled by the term “New Town” – it’s just newer than the Old Town) with red dramatic walls featuring original art that can be purchased, high windows, a gallery and a courtyard for al fresco dining. There’s also a bookstore at the front of the building (the restaurant was originally famous for being the first English bookstore in Prague), which includes international newspapers.

    The Prague National Theatre

    The National Theatre in Prague.jpg

    End your weekend in Prague with a performance at The Prague National Theatre. On any given night you’ll find opera, drama or a ballet, and the venue is home to a number of bars and restaurants. Also, the building itself is beautiful and blends different architectural styles together, most notably Renaissance Revival architecture.

    Have you spent a weekend in Prague before? Let us know how spent it in the comments below.    

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